Where is WASH in the SDGs?

Water, sanitation and hygiene provision is mentioned in Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere, Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all, and Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. 
 

Goal 1.4

By 2030 ensure that all men and women, particularly the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership, and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology, and financial services including microfinance.

Goal 4.a

Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all. 

Indicator 4.a.1: Proportion of schools with access to (a) electricity; (b) the Internet for pedagogical purposes; (c) computers for pedagogical purposes; (d) adapted infrastructure and materials for students with disabilities; (e) basic drinking water; (f) single-sex basic sanitation facilities; and (g) basic handwashing facilities (as per the WASH indicator definitions)

Goal 6.1

By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all.

Goal 6.2

By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations. 

 

How is this monitored? 

Progress towards these targets are monitored by WHO and UNICEF's Joint Monitoring Programme who have developed service ladders.
 

What is the water ladder?

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Figure 1: Joint Monitoring Programme Ladder for measuring access to water services.

'Improved drinking water' sources are those which by nature of their design and construction have the potential to deliver safe water. This includes: piped water; boreholes or tubewells; protected dug wells; protected springs and packaged or delivered water.

Safely managed water still has many data gaps with only 96 countries currently showing estimates for safely managed water. Therefore the terminology use is at least basic which includes basic and potenitally includes safely managed. 

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Figure 2: Joint Monitoring Programme definition of the differences between basic and safely managed services. 

 

What is the sanitation ladder?

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Figure 3: Joint Monitoring Programme Ladder for measuring access to sanitation services.

'Improved sanitation facilities' are those designed to hygienically separate excreta from human contact. Improved facilities include: flush/pour flush to piped sewer systems; septic tanks or pit latrines; ventilated improved pit latrines; composting toilets and pit latrines with slabs.

Safely managed sanitation still has many data gaps with only 84 countries currently showing estimates for safely managed sanitation. Therefore the terminology use is at least basic which includes basic and potentially includes safely managed.

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Figure 4: Joint Monitoring Programme definition of the differences between basic and safely managed services. 

 

What is the hygiene ladder?

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Figure 5: Joint Monitoring Programme Ladder for measuring access to hygiene services.

Hygeine still has many data gaps with only 70 countries currenlty showing estimates.